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Exiting the Goldilocks Zone Perhaps the thought of exiting this precious place in space might provoke us into turning the boosters off and altering the flight path away from the hottest thing in the galaxy?

         

If we know that the empirical count of Carbon PPM is increasing, and that it is explicitly related to global temperature increases, and that both of these variable are governable by our actions, then why are not acting? Perhaps the issue is that an x-y axis graph isn't that appealing? What if we thought of global temperature increase not as a linear graph, but in relation to our relative orbit of the Sun?

Lived experience teaches us that the closer we come to a hot object the greater we experience its heat. And so in relative notions the continual burning of fossil fuels is an equivalent to powering the orbit of 'Space Ship Earth' further and further towards the Sun. And as such the closer we (relatively) go the more likely we are to exit to 'Goldilocks Zone' as the only inhabitable part of the solar system that we know. Of the five global warming scenarios the IPCC are currently illustrating anything above SSP 2 is going to risk the 'just right' narrow degree of inhabitability we currently exist within.



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